Venture

SaaS Startup Partnerize Raises $9M While Actually Disclosing Its Valuation

Morning Markets: A quick note on how to get more attention for your funding round.

Partnerize has raised new capital, a $9 million round for the UK-based, self-described “partner management” provider. The SaaS company has now raised a total of $37.5 million.

The latest round comes in smaller than its Series B ($10 million) and its Series C ($15.4 million). But, as Partnerize isn’t raising in, say, Beijing or Silicon Valley, the rules about average raise sizes matter less. What is important for Partnerize is that it now has fresh capital in the bank to keep on, we presume, growing. Good stuff.

Normally, this sort of round gets lost in the noise of today’s venture market. There are so many huge rounds closing that smaller capital infusions struggle to break through the noise. I’ve heard a number of people in the public relations world bemoan the fact that there are far, far more rounds being announced than there are media pieces covering them. It’s musical chairs for venture activity.

One way, however, to get a bit more notice to your round is releasing more numbers than most firms will disclose. For example, some firms detail relative growth metrics when they raise, saying they have grown by X percent on average for Y years. But as they never provide a starting figure, it’s hard to tell if they are growing quickly from $1 in revenue to $10, or if the resulting figure is material. Therefore, that sort of disclosure is only so useful.

Partnerize took a different tack, sharing something concrete: its new valuation. So I can tell you, provided the company itself isn’t fibbing, that it is now worth $127 million.

As I type that I’m noticing that the world isn’t falling around me and that Partnerize is still operating. As it turns out, sharing more information about your company than expected doesn’t end life as we know it. And, frankly, if Partnerize hadn’t shared its valuation, I doubt I would have bothered to go look up its (as it turns out) somewhat interesting funding history.

And that would have been on me; regardless, you now know about one more non-American startup, so you are welcome.

Top Image Credit: Li-Anne Dias.